The Forgotten Miracle of the 9/11 Boat Evacuation

If you do not read this blog, please look at the YouTube video narrated by Tom Hanks at the end. Two more prophecy blogs are in the works, but for today, I want to join the multitude in honoring those who served New York on 9/11/01.

Many articles and details of September 11, 2001 are in the news, the blogosphere, and on social media today as people in America commemorate the 20th anniversary of the most horrible attack on U.S. soil since Pearl Harbor in 1941.

What may get lost among the recollections and lamentations is that people came together in ways that seemed amazing, simply because they were needed.  Though short lived, the event that morning “made us notice that many of us fill our lives with trivialities.”  We returned, however briefly, to spiritual and eternal values and considered the value of a life, any life.  We brought out flags, renewed our commitment to our nation, attended churches, and cooperation seemed the order of the day, even among politicians.

And in the middle of the confusion and puzzled turbulence of the day, some boaters in the Hudson and East Rivers and the Upper Bay responded to a call to help their fellow-humans.  No one knew if this was an all-out war, if more attacks were imminent, if bombers would attack the boats or if the boaters would be overwhelmed.

The “Miracle of Dunkirk” involved thousands of boats off the coast of northern France that evacuated 338,000 soldiers who were about to die as the Nazi army approached.   The call had gone out to invite small boats to the rescue because large navy vessels could not get close enough in the shallow coastal waters.  In eight days the evacuation was as complete as possible.

But in 2001, when the call went out from the Coast Guard requesting any available boats to rescue people from Manhattan Island in New York, hundreds responded.  The result was 500,000 people were evacuated in NINE hours.  Called “The Forgotten Miracle of the 9/11 Boat Evacuation,” it represented the best of our values and our love of life.  Granted there were no Nazis with machine guns coming after the evacuees, but in the carnage of the morning no one knew what to expect.

“I never want to say the word, ‘I should have…’ If I do it and I fail, I tried. If I do it and I succeed, better for me.” Vincent Ardolino, Captain, Amberjack V

So where were you between 8:46 and 9:03 EDT on September 11, 2001?
What do you remember of that day?
What were your thoughts on man’s inhumanity to man or the value of human life?
Did it change your understanding of God or divine involvement in human history?
How did it affect your view of religion, Islam in particular?
Did it change your view of what is important in your life?